Skip to main content

21 min read

Transcript: The Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast Ep. 137 - The Book of Atlassian

Ryan Spilken
Ryan Spilken
11 February 22 Podcast
Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast artwork

A long time ago (this past Tuesday) in a galaxy far, far away (their offices), Brenda, Matthew, and Ryan went a little overboard with Star Wars jokes while reviewing all the news and updates from around the Atlassian universe. They also go deep on the acquisition of ALM Works and Roadmunk by Tempo Software with an interview featuring Mark Lorion (CEO, Tempo Software), Igor Serada (General Manager, ALM Works) and Lateef Nanji (General Manager, Roadmunk).

Transcript

Ryan Spilken:

Hello everyone and welcome to the Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast. This is Episode 137, The Book of Atlassian. I am your resident protocol droid, Ryan Spilken, and joining me today are our very own Ahsoka Tano, Brenda Burrell and Cad Bane himself, Matthew Stublefield. Matthew, Brenda, may the force be with you.

Matthew Stublefield :

I thought Brenda was going to respond first, but no, she can't. I don't even know you would do that designation. That was unplanned. I don't know if I'm insulted or pleased.

Brenda Burrell:

All I know is I'm an old friend of the family.

Matthew Stublefield :

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Ryan Spilken:

Very nice. Clearly, we have been paying attention to the Disney+ series, The Book of Boba Fett. If Star Wars jokes fall out of our mouths today, well, that's okay.

Brenda Burrell:

We're not sorry.

Ryan Spilken:

No, definitely not.

Matthew Stublefield :

For our viewers at home, you know that, Adaptavist, well, we used to call Adaptavist Live and it's not actually live and not only it's not live, but it's taken us well over half an hour to start recording because we were talking about Star Wars.

Ryan Spilken:

From a certain point of view, one might consider that completely normal. Anyway.

Matthew Stublefield :

To start off, we're going to take a quick jot over to cloud city by which I mean Atlassian Cloud updates and we've got a bunch. We have seven different sections here so we'll start off with the broad Atlassian Cloud. First off, a while back, probably, almost a couple years now, Atlassian introduced the opportunity to have a sandbox, this is sort of development environment of Cloud... Probably on two years now, it's been a pandemic time.

Matthew Stublefield :

You can now view actions made in sandbox through the audit log, track those activities, see previous actions, et cetera. Just go to your organization administration and from the security tab on the top, you can navigate to that audit log, which is nice, we don't have that for the sandbox. It's also been some minor UI improvements to our overall project pages.

Matthew Stublefield :

First off, finally, at long last, thank the force, we got powered by Confluence at the bottom of the screen. That's obviously been really bugging me for a while so I'm really glad if we have that when you click on, it takes you through to Confluence. Also, we've got a connected space or page the icon and UI has been updated for that. The information's all still there but some labels have been removed to improve readability. It's just decluttered a little bit and make it a little bit more readable, so yay.

Ryan Spilken:

When you're focusing on the Jira platform that lowers you down into the carbonite, single line and multiline text fields have been renamed just for clarification to short text and paragraph. This is just aligning terminology across project types. If you make a custom field that is in a company managed project, it's going to match the terminology that they're using in team managed projects. Both project types are going to use short text for a single line and a paragraph for multiline texts.

Brenda Burrell:

You may only choose one. Over in Jira Software, releases experience has been improved for Jira Software projects. Atlassian has uplifted using the force that releases experience, tidying things up and made minor changes to the layout of the page. The new experience is similar in terms of functionality but Atlassian have rewritten the code so that they could be maintained more easily and added to in the future. Atlassian have also removed the option to trigger a Bamboo build when you release a Jira version. Bamboo and Jira Software integrations will continue to work but you'll need to run your builds directly in Bamboo rather than via a Jira release. That seems a little bit like a step back.

Matthew Stublefield :

It does. I really enjoyed being able to run a release. I do this on Prem, running a release from Jira, so that you have the sort of the data through there and then as the product manager, it was something that was just very sort of approachable for me so it started giving me that role of release manager. It does seem weird to remove this, I wonder what the rationale was.

Brenda Burrell:

I'm very curious about it.

Matthew Stublefield :

Obviously, there is no Bamboo cloud, right? Based on the wording here, I assume this is referring to the recent introduction of the connection between Jira Software Cloud and Bamboo on Prem. They've added that connection but then they've removed.

Ryan Spilken:

I mean, I would think from a product per project management standpoint that you'd want to be able to go back through the issues in a release, look at all the information, make sure it's all good and then click the button but...

Matthew Stublefield :

Maybe it's-

Brenda Burrell:

Atlassian if you're listening-

Matthew Stublefield :

We know that you are.

Brenda Burrell:

We have questions.

Matthew Stublefield :

We got the stats. We know you guys are listening. We would love for you to reach out to us. I'm sure you had very relevant, good reasons and quite minds just want to know. Plus, we could talk about The Book of Boba Fett, always happy to do that with you.

Brenda Burrell:

You may not have a choice. Continuing on in the world of Jira Software, new settings for completed epics on your roadmap, you can now define how many completed issues appear on your timeline using the new issue display range function in the view settings menu. You can set your time timeline to show completed parent level issues from the last one, three, six, nine or 12 months. You can also choose to hide all completed parent level issues. I'm sure Luke Skywalker would also like to hide his parent issues. Too soon? Too soon.

Matthew Stublefield :

No. Looking great.

Brenda Burrell:

In team-managed projects, you can now set up new statuses without leaving the workflow editor. If you add a new status in the workflow editor, you can now assign it to a board column straight away. You can choose to keep your new status hidden or drag and drop it to a column so it's visible on your board and backlog. In project pages, you can connect a project with a page. Atlassian have updated project pages so that it's possible to connect a single Confluence page rather than an entire space and do this by selecting the connect to different space or a page icon represented by two arrows.

Matthew Stublefield :

Jira service management, you can add, edit or even delete comments and insight provided you have the permission to edit an object. If you've got edit permissions, you can then [all still 00:06:51] your comments and you can also edit or delete any existing comments. You do this by selecting activity and then comments in the object view. In Jira service management, there are some new approvals or rather a new approval's configuration experience.

Matthew Stublefield :

The way that you configure your approval steps in Jira service management should become easier. This is rolling out new this week and as is so often the case that means I have no idea what this looks like or means, it is of course not on my instance yet. If you are a Jira service management user in cloud, keep an eye out for some improvements to configuring approval steps.

Brenda Burrell:

Over in Jira work management, you can now embed the list view in Confluence using smart links or richer way to jump to hyperspace. I mean, to hyperlink your team's work in other Atlassian products such as Confluence. Instead of seeing just a URL, you can now view your projects, work in the list view, simply paste the business projects, list view link into the editor and it will create a smart link.

Brenda Burrell:

You can now embed the list calendar and timeline view. You will also now see text highlighted when using search so when you search within the board view of your business project, the free text search now highlights the phrase found for issue summary, assignee or issue key. That is delightful, I appreciate that tremendously.

Ryan Spilken:

Over in Confluence, it's almost like magic but if you type into your browser URL, make.page, okay, the dot being the actual period button, it will create a Confluence page just right off the bat. The page will be created in your personal space and you could start editing right away. I dare you to type make.page into your browser right now and what's going to happen, well...

Matthew Stublefield :

Probably going to stop listening to this Podcast. If you're listening to the browser, that would be a shame, so open up a new tab first.

Ryan Spilken:

You've opened? There you go.

Matthew Stublefield :

It's very AOL, right? Having those browser bar keywords you could type in, I just love that what has done is they've gone out and they bought the domain, make.page, and then they've built in effectively a redirect and an automation so you can make pages. I'll be very curious to see how many people actually use this. I suspect so many hot keys. It will be hidden and forgotten about.

Brenda Burrell:

The people who use it will love it.

Matthew Stublefield :

I can just imagine being the person Atlassian who made this happen, if it was me, I'd just be tickled. It's just a fun, neat, cool idea. Person at Atlassian who came up with this, we need to have a drink man or a woman, I don't know. It's brilliant. It's so good.

Ryan Spilken:

Meet us in Mos Eisley.

Matthew Stublefield :

It's delightful.

Ryan Spilken:

Now, if you have access to more than one Confluence instance, I am curious as to which one it selects. This is something I'm interested to see how it works because even force magic has its limitations.

Matthew Stublefield :

Last in the Cloud, first off we'll note compass from point A, updates for that have now been added to sort of the overall cloud release notes blog. One of the things that we look at so it's kind of neat to see compass making its way into that sort of official channel and new this week, rolling out, the ability to display metrics on components. You can now create connect metrics to the components, display them on the overview page which then helps you track performance and that of their owner teams.

Matthew Stublefield :

I am in our Cloud instance, looking at compass, which is still an alpha, it's not even in beta, which is why it's particularly kind of neat to see that the release has made it to the official channel. I'm trying to figure out... I'm guessing what they mean by these metrics is what they also call scorecards, maybe it's not the scorecard because the scorecard is like a checklist of things you could have.

Matthew Stublefield :

I can't see anything else that says the word metrics. I can apply a scorecard but I think that's just for a service, there's a service readiness score card. I don't know if creating new score cards like custom ones, I don't know if that is the way. I don't know if there's some other thing that I should be doing but-

Brenda Burrell:

It is the way.

Matthew Stublefield :

It's also incredibly likely that it hasn't rolled out to me yet and there will be an option called metrics so be curious to see what the options are there if it's completely custom. If you are in the compass alpha, this is publishing on Friday by then maybe we'll have access to it otherwise we'll circle back around next week.

Brenda Burrell:

Before we completely leave the atmosphere of cloud city, you can now learn what's new in Jira cloud, within product release notes and much like Din Djarin's heavily customized N-1 starfighters this was a thing you didn't know you needed until you had it. You can now see what's new in Jira without leaving Jira, this is really fantastic. Your release notes are contextual, based on what features are delivered to your Jira site specifically, you'll be able to view the most recent three months of feature announcements, improvements, bug fixes experiments and more.

Brenda Burrell:

To do this, log into your Jira site, select help over the question mark from the top navigation bar and select find out what's changed in Jira. You will see what's changed in your Jira Software, Jira service management or Jira work management products directly from that help menu. These notes will be published when a change has rolled out to your specific Jira site. You can filter, sort and view updates from the past three months as I said earlier. This allows you to stay up to date with the latest and greatest from Atlassian, you can easily find out about new features and improvements.

Brenda Burrell:

You will not have to wait and wonder when does the change hit your Jira site. You will be able to see it exactly once it's rolled out and this allows you to stay in context and focused on your work. You won't have to worry about creating a new tab, switching over to Google, looking for the support website, finding the release notes to see what the latest developments are, blazing-fast just like that starfighter. Fun fact, over 90,000 people viewed Jira's in product release notes the first week alone.

Matthew Stublefield :

That is a fun fact.

Brenda Burrell:

I approve wholeheartedly. Check out those in product release notes, I think that's pretty spiffy.

Ryan Spilken:

Another way that you could keep up to date with Atlassian release notes in context is by listening to this Podcast.

Matthew Stublefield :

Turning to on Prem applications, very brief notes this two-week period. Service desk 4.21.1 and Jira Software 8.21.1, exact same update, there was a bug release. The summary is Jira dashboard gadgets failed to load on Chrome, specifically versions 97 and 98 of Chrome. Of course, I closed Chrome before we started the podcast because I was trying to save resources and I can't open and see what version I'm on. Looks like 97 was released on January 4th, so it's a relatively release version. My guess is if you've updated Chrome latest version's probably fine but if you're on that older one, maybe you'll have to update Jira. That is the only release in these versions of Jira service desk and Jira Software.

Brenda Burrell:

Well, while the Jira on Prem updates may be a little slim, Confluence 7.16. O is a nice beefy point or a nice beefy release, including the ability to clean up historical data automatically, allowing you to set policies of how long you want to retain historical data around number of versions, age of versions, et cetera. A scheduled job will delete excess in small batches so as not to impact your site's performance.

Brenda Burrell:

By default, this job runs every 10 minutes so take some time to plan your retention rule strategy before you set the rule. Historical versions in trash will be permanently deleted almost immediately so just a word of caution before you go in guns blazing on that one. You'll have a lot of flexibility around that and you can allocate the cleanup responsibilities, you can allow rules to be configured in space tools for each space.

Brenda Burrell:

The space administrators who know the content well could be the ones doing this clean up or you can restrict the responsibility just to system admins so this could be set for your whole site or on a space by space basis using exemptions. You'll have faster permission checks for complex sites. There are situations where Confluence might need to track the current user's permissions in order to determine what to display.

Brenda Burrell:

For example, to render the task report macro, we need to find all the pages with a task assigned to the user, check if they have permissions to see the spaces and the pages the task appears on. These checks can consume a lot of memory and can make some parts of Confluence loads slowly especially if you are someone with complex permissions. The faster permissions service changes the way permissions information is stored which allows Confluence to check permissions on a large number of pages more quickly, can be a significant performance improvement in insights with a lot of consent and complex permissions. That's very cool.

Brenda Burrell:

You can use multiple identity providers, you can now configure multiple, similar open ID connect identity providers for single sign on. You can go to the gear icon, general configuration authentication methods, which was formally SSO 2.O, check that out. If you enable more than one authentication method, your users will see a login page with the available options and you can customize the button labels to suit your team's terminology.

Brenda Burrell:

You can block basic authentication, preventing people from authenticating with username and password forcing them to go the SSO route, you can exclude spaces from the data pipeline, allowing you to export Confluence data for analysis in your favorite business intelligence tool by adding them to an opt-out list. Useful if you don't need to report on particular spaces or if they contain sensitive content you don't want to export. A number of issues have been resolved. For full details of all of the bugs, check out the link that we will post in the show notes.

Matthew Stublefield :

One key one to call out is that, support has, at long last, been added for SQL Server 2019. For those of you who are running on SQL Server 2017, mainstream support for that ends in about seven months so you want to make your upgrade plans for upgrading SQL Server to at least 2019 and then the new version Confluences will support it. However, that compatibility will not be back-ported to the Confluence 7.13 long term support version. FYI, I guess, make your upgrade plans now.

Ryan Spilken:

All right, a few weeks ago on the Podcast, we talked about the acquisition of ALM Works by Tempo Software and we said that we would reach out to the crew to discuss the news. Well, the crew responded and they responded in a big way. It is my distinct pleasure to welcome to the Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast today, the CEO of Tempo Software, Mark Lorion.

Mark Lorion:

Hello, thanks for the invite.

Ryan Spilken:

Such a pleasure. The General Manager of ALM Works, Igor Sereda.

Igor Sereda:

Hey, thanks for having me.

Ryan Spilken:

Frequent guest, long time friend to the Podcast. Nice to see you. Last but of certainly not least, Latif Nanji, the General Manager of Roadmunk. Welcome Latif.

Latif Nanji:

Thanks for having me.

Ryan Spilken:

Thank you all so much for taking the time to discuss this major move in the Atlassian Ecosystem. The first question that we are just dying to know is, from you Mark, when Tempo was looking at its future, how did you decide to link the time tracking with the project management solutions that ALM and Roadmunk provide?

Mark Lorion:

It's a good question, Ryan. We've known the businesses and Latif and Igor for a very long time. We've been partners and kind of working in conjunction with some shared customers for quite some time. What we have realized is that most Tempo time management customers are using Tempo in conjunction with road mapping and project management tools, right? Most people tend to plan and budget and track their time around projects and it was very natural for us to be integrating with project management tools in various capacities out there.

Mark Lorion:

When we looked, it looked like a number of our customers were already using as in conjunction with the ALM Works structured product line or Roadmunk and they were planning and budgeting and tracking their time against some of those projects. We wanted to be able to offer our customers opportunities to have tighter product integrations and we thought bringing the products and the teams into the business would be the best way to do that. Over time, we anticipate having more integrated versions that would be available for our partners and for our customers alike.

Matthew Stublefield :

There's a lot of moving to pieces to this, right? For Igor and Latif, like you're coming in, there's the financials of acquisition but there's also the culture pieces, there's the working together. So when this process began, you all have known each other for a long time and Mark you said you were looking at this but for Igor and Latif, how'd the process start for you and what got this ball rolling?

Latif Nanji:

Well, I think it always starts with the leadership teams sitting down and discussing what their vision for the future is. When Tempo and Mark came to us and they talked about how they wanted their customers to be more thoughtful in their strategic approaches to which projects they were picking, which initiatives they were going to work on and how that data was going to play a role in that, that was very compelling for us because we didn't have access to that data but that was what our customers were asking for.

Latif Nanji:

Because that was a really big piece of the early conversations about how we would be able to overlap, talk about our products working together and see that future where we could get greater than the sum of the individual parts if they were to be standing alone and that really propelled some really interesting discussions. To your point when talking about culture, when we sat down with the team in Montreal and we looked at how they thought about decision makings, their process around decisions or collaboratively bringing in their teams, there was an element there that just felt different from other companies that we had spoken to.

Latif Nanji:

When I went back to the rest of my leadership team, we were glowing, we felt this was going to be such a great fit and in the last few months, that's absolutely paid off. We believe that the work that we're doing together at the partnership level, as they have certain elements of their go to market that are not in our business so that we can leverage and vice versa, we're off to a running start and that's something that I've always wanted to do when being in a situation where there's an acquisition and a merger of two companies. We'd really found a great new home in that regard.

Igor Sereda:

For us, Tempo and Structure tools were actually talking to each other before the leadership teams was talking to each other, right? We had some integrations done in the past. Then it happened so that Mark and I live very close to each other so we started meeting for talking business and then this notion of, "Right, maybe we can join forces," came up. As I was thinking about this, "What's my purpose? What I am trying to achieve?" The goal for ALM Works has been empowering project managers for a long time.

Igor Sereda:

We try to make life a little more easy, more efficient for all these folks and just globally considering what can we achieve as ALM Works separately and what we can achieve as a part of this large organization makes so much difference and I already see how our products can amplify each other. But you also mentioned the culture and that was a very important point. I be honest, I didn't go to this easy and this way I made sure that we are all aligned and I've seen and met Mark obviously but also his leadership team at Tempo and now I'm getting to know more and more people at Tempo and they're just great. The culture fit is there so I'm very hopeful and excited to other joint future.

Mark Lorion:

Also, just, thank you, Igor and Latif, you guys have been phenomenal business partners. I really underscore that cultural point. It's just an absolute pleasure to see the teams working together and partnering together and we already shared a lot of shared business partners and customers but I think even the way that people go about working, we are becoming one organization with a real goal of changing the way that our customers plan and track their work and we think better integrating the planning side of how decisions are made and the tracking and understanding of capacity and exposing capacity in the earlier planning phases of work, we think is going to change the way that companies run their projects and they run product roadmaps. We think there's a huge opportunity there.

Brenda Burrell:

You've made it very clear that all of you have a strong customer focus and I'm grateful to hear that you really know your customer base well. To kind of follow along with that, Mark, how will this affect your existing customers and your new ones?

Mark Lorion:

Well, it should be seamless for existing customers. I think over time it'll be kind of single points of contact for customers and partners alike because we've got a broader portfolio and we'll have the ability to communicate solutions and support customers and partners equally as our teams now are going through the process of becoming trained internally on the full portfolio, both supporting existing products. Then as we begin introducing points of integration, we'll have the teams trained on those joint solutions and new offers. We believe that if we do our job right, it should be seamless for customers and partners and then over time be even more valuable because they'll get more of that value from these sort of single points of contact and single points of experience.

Brenda Burrell:

Excellent. Thank you.

Ryan Spilken:

All right. We're kind of nerds, I'll just come right out and say it. Are there some things, some integration points, some features that customers can be looking forward to in the coming months, years, that you can kind of give us a little taste of? Some exciting buttons to click to make our lives a little easier.

Mark Lorion:

Although Ryan, you did say that we had to be limited in our time, so you're talking to a number of other nerds and geeks on the call here that love this stuff. I'll let Latif and Igor, you guys should jump in. But as it was said, the teams had already been working together even before those of us kind of started working with each other kind of look for data points that could be naturally shared. In some cases, Ryan, that will be kind of product to product.

Mark Lorion:

In other cases, one of the things that we all share is a love and kind of circling around Jira, right? Even Latif's Roadmunk product line, which is not offered in the Atlassian marketplace, has a beautiful integration with Jira so being able to use and have data flow through all of our products through Jira up into the different pieces of software I think gives more insight into customers using it. But maybe Igor and Latif want comment a little bit about that information, what they think might be seen over time.

Matthew Stublefield :

Oh yeah, come on guys, let's hear it.

Latif Nanji:

Absolutely. I think, obviously, the regular future disclaimers around timing and such but some of the work that's being done in the background is looking at how our customers and Tempo's customers overlap with respect to capacity and time management and how that data flows up from a tracking perspective into roadmaps and prioritization models. What does it look like just sort of as a kind of a template use case is, "Hey, I'm investing in this initiative with this ROI. How much time am I investing building this and what does that kind of look like in the future from an ROI and maintenance point of view?"

Latif Nanji:

Usually you do that kind of work and you guesstimate what it might look like. But now you're actually being able to look at it from a product portfolio management more intensively. These are some of the projects that we're exploring from a design perspective, looking at how those details would flush out but that would be a teaser of what might be next to come in terms of an integration in the future.

Igor Sereda:

From Structures perspective, we are focused on the visibility on providing the ingesting data into Structure then letting the user reflect how they work in their workspaces using flexible configurations, metrics and whatnot so the more data we can get in the better. We can see a case where something like a high level plan comes from Roadmunk gets sucked into structure then it gets broken down into the specific initiatives and work. Then it gets informed by the time tracking, team capacity information or costs from the Tempo site and it gets tracked over time. You have some metrics that inform how you change, how you go, your decisions and then it gets strong and reported back to the high level teams.

Mark Lorion:

Ryan, I'll put a plugin for Adaptavist and other partners and customers out there, I mean, we're in sort of true product and product management form, really interested in talking with partners and customers about how to prioritize that work. We have a number of different models that we're pursuing right now but also looking for some early partners and customers to help us prioritize that work and to figure out the best way to design that and to bring those solutions.

Mark Lorion:

I think over time we believe that we want our customers to be able to sort of look at the portfolio of potential investments, whether that's a product initiative or a project and how should they best allocate their limited capacity or team to get that work done. Our belief is that there's going to be some really interesting solutions in that lane but we'd love to use customer and partner feedback to help prioritize that.

Ryan Spilken:

Well, Mark, we happen to know some people at Adaptivist, so we'll make sure that you're connected.

Mark Lorion:

Thank you.

Matthew Stublefield :

Before we close, I just want to congratulate all of you. This is very exciting and it's wonderful to see the growth in the ecosystem at large for your companies. Mark, I was actually, years ago at an Atlassian office in San Francisco, when they got this lovely collection of cakes sent to them by Tempo to celebrate their first million dollars in sales.

Matthew Stublefield :

It's really exciting to connect with the three of you today and celebrate another sort of milestone, another step in this journey of growth and I particularly have a heart for project to portfolio management and making that easier for people because it isn't often and anything we could do, to help people focus on their work instead of having to wrestle with the tools, I think is all to the good. Kudos to all of you, I think this is just really exciting.

Mark Lorion:

Well, thank you, Matthew. We're we're building a cake together, right? There are different layers of cake and frosting that are coming together with the broadening portfolio of products that we have and we think we can deliver some really great and remarkable value to our partners and customers so thank you.

Matthew Stublefield :

Thank you very much. You made me hungry.

Ryan Spilken:

Now all I can think about is this raspberry layered cake but we'll come back to that another time. Mark Lorion, Igor Sereda and Latif Nanji, thank you all so much for joining us on the Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast today.

Mark Lorion:

Thank you.

Latif Nanji:

Thanks for having us.

Igor Sereda:

Thank you.

Matthew Stublefield :

If you want to hear more from Adaptavist Tempo and other partners like Appfire and SmartBear, we will be at Team '22. Atlassian Team '22 coming up at the beginning of April. If you haven't already gotten your tickets, made the plans to get out to Vegas for the first in person Atlassian conference we've been able to have for years. I don't even know how many years at this point but it's exciting.

Matthew Stublefield :

The day before Team '22 kicks off, we are having App Day 2022 on April 5th. We will link to a LinkedIn post, there's a sort of like a save-the-date on there and Adaptivist, Appfire, SmartBear, Tempo, which now means included our friends at ALM Works and Roadmunk will be there so you can learn more about the apps and what's coming next as we all work together to make the Atlassian Ecosystem even better.

Ryan Spilken:

Finally, some news from Adaptavist, we have expanded into a galaxy far away called the Benelux Region and Adaptavist actually incorporated an office in Amsterdam so I'm looking forward to visiting that office someday, hopefully, maybe soon. We are looking forward to supporting customers across the Benelux Region with expert consultancy and of course our world class apps but we're here to support enterprise Agile, DevOps, ITSM Migrations and more across a growing portfolio of technology platforms. If you or someone you know is hanging out in the Benelux Region, come say hi to Adaptavist.

Brenda Burrell:

Might be worth noting, I'd never heard Benelux before.

Ryan Spilken:

True.

Brenda Burrell:

I am realizing that that is Belgium, Netherlands and Luxembourg but that might not be a term people are familiar with.

Ryan Spilken:

Ah, fair.

Matthew Stublefield :

The headline really highlights the Netherlands, which is this group of area. Another fun fact from this blog post, I wasn't aware of, Simon, our CEO had this blog post and states, "The Netherlands technology market is the 13th biggest in the world with spending on software and outsourcing services growing at a faster rate than that of the other top six EU economies." That is stunning to me. Really just like the funnest of facts.

Brenda Burrell:

We've had some good fun facts.

Ryan Spilken:

That's such a fun fact. Oh man.

Brenda Burrell:

The facts have been very fun.

Matthew Stublefield :

Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Ryan Spilken:

Theme every episode of Star Wars with all this fun we're having. It clearly with such a big growing economy, they obviously need the three of us to show up and do stuff, right? In the Netherlands, right?

Brenda Burrell:

I think so.

Matthew Stublefield :

Yeah.

Ryan Spilken:

Then obviously.

Matthew Stublefield :

I got a bad feeling about this.

Brenda Burrell:

Well, that's all we have for this episode, folks. Thanks for sticking with us through all of our Star Wars jokes. Reporting live but not really from the Mos Eisley Cantina. On behalf of protocol droid, Ryan Spilken and Cade Bane, Matthew Stublefield, I am Ahsoka Tano/ Brenda Burrell. Please like and share this Podcast wherever you like and share fine Podcasts. Thanks again for listening. This is the Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast part of the Adaptavist Live Network of Podcasts.