8 min read

Transcript: The Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast Ep. 126 - There are four quadrants

Ryan Spilken
Ryan Spilken
15 September 2021 Podcast
Atlassian Ecosystem artwork

Show Notes

Articles covered on this episode include...

Atlassian Cloud Updates 30.08 - 13.09:
https://confluence.atlassian.com/cloud/blog/2021/09/atlassian-cloud-changes-aug-30-to-sep-6-2021
https://confluence.atlassian.com/cloud/blog/2021/09/atlassian-cloud-changes-sep-6-to-sep-13-2021

Generating a Java REST Client for Confluence Cloud:
https://blog.developer.atlassian.com/generating-a-java-rest-client-for-confluence-cloud/

Deprecating Atlassian account password for Bitbucket API and Git activity:
https://bitbucket.org/blog/deprecating-atlassian-account-password-for-bitbucket-api-and-git-activity

Atlassian Named a Visionary in the 2021 Gartner ® Magic Quadrant for IT Service Management Tools:

Vote for scripts on the Adaptavist Library:
https://library.adaptavist.com

New Documentation Theme:
https://docs.adaptavist.com

ScriptRunner on sale!:
https://my.adaptavist.group

Transcript

Ryan Spilken:

Hello everyone, and welcome to the Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast. This is episode 126: There are four quadrants. Four quadrants! I'm your host, Ryan Spilken, and joining me today are three hosts for four quadrants, Matthew Stublefield and Brenda Burrell. Matthew, Brenda, math is hard.

Matthew Stublefield:

You already had that double vision going there.

Ryan Spilken:

I don't even... Yeah, it's like that gif that you see of the lady thinking while all of the numbers floated in and around. That's what's happening right now in my head

Matthew Stublefield:

Some big brains. We all start counting from zero, but Ryan, the biggest brain, starts counting from two.

Ryan Spilken:

I live in base three. Before we get any more confused, let's take a look at the news from the Atlassian cloud, from the 30th of August to the 13th of September. A fairly light set of updates beginning with the overall cloud platform, where data residency is now available in Australia. G'day! I would point out the team-managed projects are very flexible. So keeping language consistent between the two. Well, that's... Good luck with that. Both project types will use short text for single-line text fields and paragraph, for multiline text fields. Now, since these are already the field names in the team-managed projects, no changes will be made there. Also, for the Jira platform, you can filter by components and labels in the timeline list and calendar view.

Ryan Spilken:

Finally, for the Jira platform, all of your notifications are now in one place, giving you another notification to turn off. Atlassian is updating how you view your in-product notifications. All of your notifications will show up in the menu and now you can sort those notifications to show the ones you haven't read. They've also removed the ability to delete notifications so you don't have to worry about losing them. I'd really hope that they go away from your view quickly though, because man, do I hate old notifications. So to help you meet company and regulatory requirements, you can now choose to have your in-scope product data hosted in Australia. As long as your product is eligible for data residency, Australia will now appear in the list of available locations alongside Europe and the United States of America. On the Jira platform, single line, and multiline text custom fields have been renamed to short text and paragraph In an effort to align terminology across project types, Atlassian has renamed custom fields and company managed projects to match those that are in team managed projects.

Matthew Stublefield:

Ryan, do you remember that Twitter app, Hootsuite that let us create columns, lists, and we could filter our tweets? I feel like I'm meeting Hootsuite for Atlassian at this point. They get all my notifications, keep getting more and more in one place, and I'm like, I really need something that I can sort of sequence these things out.

Ryan Spilken:

Have you heard about Trello?

Matthew Stublefield:

Now that's a cool idea for Trello power-up. If we could take notifications, create a card for each one, filter it across the... You should get that base three brain going Ryan. Use that. It could be made.

Ryan Spilken:

Oh, it hurts. It hurts. So if you're looking for a next project for your hack day, you're welcome. You're welcome. Moving on to Jira Service Management, as of August 30th, 2021, no legacy automation will be available for a new Jira Service Management signup. So if you are signing up for Jira Service Management tomorrow, you won't have legacy automation, but that's okay because you're getting new automation. So if you're an existing user, legacy automation, won't be available for when you sign up for a new site, but for your existing sites, your legacy automation experience isn't effected. Wow, that's it for the cloud these past two weeks.

Matthew Stublefield:

Everybody's off on summer holiday.

Ryan Spilken:

Who can blame them? It's nice.

Brenda Burrell:

For those who are not off on summer holidays, you may be interested in a developer blog for generating a Java REST Client for confluence cloud. Personally, that makes me want to take a summer holiday. So the Atlassian developer blog has a very detailed post on how to do this. Confluences rest API has lots of endpoints with combinations of parameters. It can be very confusing to have to write this from scratch every time. So if you only need a couple of confluence API calls, or if you're talking to multiple APIs from multiple vendors, to make your life easier, you can use a code generation tool to write working code to call to confluence. This can save you a lot of time if you're doing this on a regular basis. So this post goes through the process of generating Java code from the open API specification published by Atlassian, uses Swagger Codegen, and then goes through an example Java application that creates a page in confluence cloud.

Brenda Burrell:

It's pretty detailed. It gives lots of good reference links. Developers, if you're interested in this sort of thing, this is a really useful blog post for you. Walks you through generating this client code, running some commands to build all of this usable client project in a current directory, configuring your code generation parameters, generating the code. It talks a little bit about version control. I mean, it's a very thorough article on the process for doing this. So we'll link to this in the show notes. This is a specific example for Java, but it should work with other languages as well. So it's actually pretty thorough. Check it out if you're not on summer holiday and are interested in generating Java REST clients.

Brenda Burrell:

On the subject of developing for Atlassian, for those of you that work in BitBuckets, be aware that Atlassian is deprecating Atlassian account password for BitBuckets API and GIT activity. So starting... We're recording this on September 14th effective yesterday, September 13th, new BitBucket users will not be able to use their personal Atlassian account passwords when using basic authentication with the BitBucket API or get over https. You will now need to use BitBucket app passwords. Users who had an Atlassian account prior to September 13th, 2021 will still be able to use their Atlassian account password to authenticate with BitBucket API or GIT until March 1st, 2022. So if you're setting up a new account, you have to use these app passwords. If you have an existing account, you'll have to phase over by March of 2021, or 2022. What year is it? What day is it? I don't know.

Brenda Burrell:

So this will walk you through and we'll link this in the show notes, the steps to create an app password. This will also affect OAuth 2.0 resource owner password credentials, grant flow, and obtaining a two-step verification recovery token over SSH. So if those words are meaningful to you, you'll want to check out the article that we will link in the show notes.

Ryan Spilken:

Have either of you met Grant Flow?

Matthew Stublefield:

From Business Wire, we have the news that Atlassian has been named a visionary in the 2021 Gartner Magic Quadrant for IT Service Management tools. Then when we first came upon this article, I was a little confused. I was like, wasn't Atlassian already on this? So I had to look back at 2020 and Atlassian has been in Gartner's Magic Quadrant sort of display reports for Enterprise Agile Management for a long time, but IT Service Management, they haven't appeared on there, which has always kind of surprised me. They've had Jira service desk for a long time. I know a lot of companies have been using the Atlassian Suite for IT Service Management for a long time. But over the last year, they are now recognized by Gartner, placed in the quadrant and in particular, placed in the visionary quadrant, which I think is very exciting.

Matthew Stublefield:

So you can get a free copy of this report. You can download it from here. I think one of the key things, this is one of the three major beliefs that influence Atlassian's vision for ITSM and the one that I think is particularly important. It's number three, right-sized, cost-effective functionality is crucial. That's one of the ones that when I'm talking with people always comes up because it's always this comparison of Atlassian and ServiceNow. There's this recognition that yeah, ServiceNow is the powerhouse. It's the go-to for ITSM. It's the one that does everything. But by virtue of doing everything, it is quite expensive and it does a lot that a lot of businesses don't quite need. So I think the modular approach that Atlassian has taken, I mean really over the last 15 years, that modular approach design and applications, and letting teams kind of pick the right tools for them, but then having them all operate well together and provide that transparency and that sort of end to end visibility and communication on the same platform.

Matthew Stublefield:

I think it's a winning strategy. So this year, they're in the visionary quadrant, not too far off from leader, wouldn't be surprised 2022, we're coming back to this and they've moved on up. If like me, you want to compare against last year's, we can see some others like Avanti that have moved up and some that have dropped off or move down. So kind of interesting to track this year to year, but see Atlassian pop up in 2021, pretty exciting. Congratulations Atlassian for this recognition and I'm sure we'll continue to see growth in this area in the coming years.

Ryan Spilken:

Now moving on to some news from Adaptavist, where on the Adaptivist library, you can exercise your rights and vote on the scripts that are most useful. So if you haven't headed over to library.adaptavist.com, we're going to link you here in the show notes. Head on over there, peruse the collection of scripts that are available, sign in, use the script and let us know how they're useful by giving them a little up or a down vote, that'd be super great.

Matthew Stublefield:

Also, from Adaptavist over at docs.adaptavist.com, which has all of our product documentation. There is a new doc theme, which is pretty exciting. This has been kind of an ongoing project for a long time to unify Adaptavist product documentation to a single website, which happened earlier this year and then to sort of change the look and feel so it really feels like an Adaptavist website, but also it's just more readable, easier to navigate, more consistent, handles code samples better, and just a lot of other improvements. So take a look at docs.adaptavist.com, where we are using Scroll Viewport from K15Tt for the theming and the custom theme itself actually built, designed, and implemented by our friends at Brew Digital.

Ryan Spilken:

Oh, wonderful. It's nice to hear about a little bit of cross pollination there mentioned in K15t. They're such good folks.

Matthew Stublefield:

I got to say they've been tremendous help to us, and actually we'll be publishing a case study on their site soon about our documentation and the theme that we've built.

Ryan Spilken:

All right. Well, you can look for some links to those here. Finally, from Adaptavist, it's a sale. I am always doing my shopping. You, faithful listeners, can get six months free on the Adaptavist app of your choice on cloud or data center until the end of 2021, until the 31st of December, you got all the way to go. Okay. This includes ScriptRunner for Jira, for Confluence, ScrippedRunner for BitBucket, content formatting macros, forums for Confluence, community forums for Confluence as well. Now, you have to have a current or recently expired server license of one of these apps to qualify for a discount on the cloud or data center version of that same app. This discount can only be applied to a single product. So if you have multiple Adaptavist apps, you can choose which app you'd like to claim six free months of. All right. So to get that discount, we're going to link you to the website in our show notes. Wow. Yeah, that's it team! There are four quadrants and we have gone through five of them.

Matthew Stublefield:

As always, it was a pleasure sailing the four seas with you all.

Brenda Burrell:

Our math and our metaphors fall apart.

Ryan Spilken:

Well, thank you all for listening. We appreciate you and hope that you don't mind sharing this podcast wherever fine podcasts are liked and shared. Make sure you're connecting with us on social media at Adaptavist and let us know what you want us to talk about or if you've got an idea for a story. From Brenda Burrell and Matthew Stubblefield, I'm Ryan Spilken and we'll catch you next time on the Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast. Part of the Adaptavist Live family of shows.