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Transcript: The Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast Ep. 140 - Matthew Signs Off

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Matthew Stublefield's last episode features discussions about updates to Atlassian cloud, as well as on-premise Jira, Confluence, and Bitbucket.

Transcript

Ryan Spilken:

Hello and welcome to the Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast. This is episode 140, Matthew Signs Off. Wait, what? Hold on a second. I'm your host, Ryan Spilken, and joining me today are Brenda Burrell and the aforementioned Matthew. Matthew, you're signing off? What's that about?

Matthew Stublefield:

Dear listeners, despite Ryan's supposed confusion, I'm not springing this on him with a Trello card. I am announcing though, this will be my last podcast with the Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast and potentially last time in the Atlassian ecosystem in general. So I have been with Adaptavist for seven and a half years now and working with Atlassian software for 15. But I have accepted a position at another company called Stride Learning and join them just next week as a director of product management for career platform. So I'm very sad to be leaving Adaptavist. I'm especially sad to be leaving Ryan and Brenda, not just because this podcast, but we've worked together for a long time and the rest of my teams here at Adaptavist, just tremendously brilliant people, all of whom I love.

Matthew Stublefield:

But at the same time, I'm very excited for this new opportunity to develop the strategy and the vision for this career platform and contribute to Stride's mission of helping learners of all ages, reach their full potential through teaching and personalized learning. It's something I'm really passionate out. And I think I'd be part of how we make our society, our whole world better is by improving education for people. Yeah. I'm ambivalent, I think it's probably the best word to use. I'm thrilled and sad and excited and happy and a bit morose.

Ryan Spilken:

Maybe a little thirsty. You could use a snack.

Matthew Stublefield:

Could use a snack. We're coming up on lunchtime as we so often are with this podcast. But anyways, yeah. This is it. For better or worse, will be the last release notes and updates on which I report for the Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast. So thank you all for listening to me ramble for these years we've been doing this. I don't know how long it's been now. Almost five years I think that we've been doing this podcast.

Brenda Burrell:

Almost five years.

Matthew Stublefield:

Yeah. Thank you all. I'm sorry I won't get to see you next time at team at a conference, we always enjoyed connecting with our listeners at the conference. I'm sad I won't get that opportunity again but I'm thankful for the opportunities that I did have. So thank you all for listening and for this opportunity to talk about Atlassian with you.

Brenda Burrell:

We're excited for you. We're going to miss you. We're a little bit angry with you but mostly we're happy for you.

Ryan Spilken:

I'm just upset that you gave away my gag at the beginning. Come on, man.

Brenda Burrell:

We all know that your beginnings are always a gag.

Ryan Spilken:

Or someone is gagging, one of the two.

Brenda Burrell:

Both can happen at the same time.

Ryan Spilken:

Why not both? That being said, we can't let Matthew off easy. There are a ton of updates to get to. So let's jump into the Atlassian Cloud. Brenda, take it away.

Brenda Burrell:

I have the privilege of bringing you some Jira platform updates in the cloud. First and foremost, you can now restore dashboards from the trash. Atlassian has heard, there are times you might want a dashboard back after you delete it. So they've added the option to restore that dashboard instead of deleting it right away. Dashboards that have been deleted are restorable until they are permanently deleted after 60 days. So you have 60 days to change your mind once you've deleted that dashboard. There is also a faster way to refresh your dashboard. So for the ones you don't delete, you don't have to refresh your gadgets one by one, and you don't have to reload the entire dashboard it's page. You can now get the latest updates to all gadgets in just one click by going to a dashboard and selecting refresh.

Brenda Burrell:

All workflow validation errors will now be showing in one place. Again, Atlassian has heard your cries. Going back and forth with errors while working with issues could be a hassle. So all validation errors will now be in one place if you have multiple validation errors when creating an issue or moving an issue through its workflow. Admins can now retain access to a private filter by changing its owner. Losing private filters from deleted users can be something of a hassle. So admins will now have the power to change who owns private shared filters. So if a private filters owner leaves your team Matthew... Sorry, couldn't resist. Had to get the jab in... you can still access that filter by having its owner changed. And this is written as collaborate easier which triggers all of my grammatical pet entry. You can now collaborate more easily with edit permissions. No longer have to copy and recreate filters just to collaborate. A filters owner can give anyone on the team permission to edit it. Go to the filters, select details, and then edit permissions.

Ryan Spilken:

Jira software sends me right back to our Star Wars jokes from the other episode where a name that we haven't seen in a very long time has arisen. And that's FishEye. It's looking at you out the side of its face. But the first update for Jira software is that you're now able to bulk review all FishEye commits associated with a single Jira issue. If you are still using FishEye crucible, and you've got that integrated with Jira software, Atlassian has added a new bulk review link to the commits tab in the development details dialogue. So rather than creating individual reviews for each file, you can now create reviews for all the commits associated with the Jira issue in one go. Matthew, do you feel a disturbance in the force?

Matthew Stublefield:

I don't. Our listeners may have picked up the application here but just to make it perfectly clear, there is no [fickle 00:06:36] for cloud. This isn't talking about FishEye Cloud. It's on premise only. This is for when you've integrated or you, for whatever reason, want to integrate FishEye crucible on-prem with your Jira software cloud instance. Yeah. They've got their DC version. So apparently it lives on.

Ryan Spilken:

Well, checking these release notes on a routine basis, you'd think I'd know that. And yet also in Jira software, the code feature has gotten an update to make it easier for you to use it. Once you jump into the code in Jira page, it's going to provide you with guidance and help you to connect your SCM tool, link repositories into your Jira software project, see development insights, and more. To check that out, go to code in the project menu.

Ryan Spilken:

Roadmaps in Jira software have been updated to give you inline issue create for story level issues. And I love this. Now, when you want to insert child issues into your roadmap view, you won't need to reposition them after they're created. This new update allows you to create and then insert a child issue. Boom, just hover on the edge of two issues between which you'd like to create a new one. Select a plus that appears. Make your issue. Put it in the roadmap. Get your teams to work on it. Boom, job done.

Ryan Spilken:

Also in the roadmap section of your software, you can now infer dates from releases. You can schedule issues based on the releases to which they're assigned in the same way you could with sprint dates. We will provide you with links in the show notes to learn more about the wild world of scheduling issues. And let me tell you, oh baby, it's a wild world. And finally, in the roadmaps in Jira software, you are able to edit issue descriptions from the roadmap view which will make your life in that area much easier.

Matthew Stublefield:

Turning to Jira service management in the cloud. There is a new permission that's been added creating an additional granularity. This is the extending the permission to edit in an object. Now will also allow you to add comments to an object and edit or delete any existing comments. So that's under the activity and then comments section in the object view. That said, if you have a free plan or an evaluator, there is a new feature/feature removal in these release notes. Content editing for customer notification is disabled for free plans and evaluators now. Atlassian giveth, and Atlassian taketh away.

Matthew Stublefield:

There've all been some changes to incidents in Jira service management to improve communications around them. So if you have your Jira service management cloud instance connected to a Slack workspace, you can automate the creation of dedicated chat channels for each incident. So you can have a channel automatically created for an incident. This is a really good way to bring the whole team together in one place. Swarm on the incident and get it resolved, conduct an after action, meeting. Great way to do it.

Matthew Stublefield:

Note that of all of these different features, the ability to create the channel. There's going to be the ability to send emails to incident stakeholders and automatically update them to market incident as major and view them in a separate queue, all kinds of improvements here. Some of them will automatically happen or visible, some have to be turned on. So you'll need to go investigate this and if you are like me with my perennial cloud instance, you may not see these yet. So check on them over the next week or so.

Matthew Stublefield:

Also the major incidence section that pulls incidents from ops genie has been removed as well as the create major incident button from the top of issue review, that's also been removed. Instead, there's now a major incident toggle under the detail section of the issue view. So you would just create an issue and then you would toggle it to say that it's major instead of having this whole separate workflow for it. So that simplifies the UI and the creation process a little bit. There's a community post that will link to... It's just linked to from the release notes so you can find your way there that goes over all the different changes to incidents. So just a ton of changes there all at once.

Ryan Spilken:

Do you think that's going to make, like add a level of intimidation to the person who's filing the incident? Oh God, is it major?

Matthew Stublefield:

Hopefully, you already have a service management policy that helps determine whether or not it's considered major depending on the systems that are impacted in the uses of those.

Brenda Burrell:

Having a policy does not lessen the anxiety of submitting something.

Matthew Stublefield:

That's fair. Well, fair enough.

Ryan Spilken:

Especially, if you cause the incident but that's a whole other story.

Matthew Stublefield:

Yeah. It does make it easier to change your mind though. You can toggle it on or off. So if you put it in wrong, you can fix that. SLA format for longer dates has been approved. I don't know how we didn't know how long dates were before but it's introducing relative time and day. So today, yesterday, tomorrow, or you can do exact date for breached SLAs and a tool tip to show if you got relative dating on there. And last, QR code enabled and insight for Jira service management. I'm 99% certain, this is one of the features we've had on-prem for a long time. I think insight started with barcodes back in the day. I was using insight, oh geez, nine-ish years ago. But I can't remember if the barcode thing was built into insight or if I had a separate approach for that. We've moved on from barcodes as a society, or were starting to anyways take QR codes where you can have more metadata embedded in them.

Brenda Burrell:

You have clearly not gone grocery shopping and done a self-checkout recently.

Matthew Stublefield:

Well, groceries don't have a lot of metadata for them but when you're doing asset management, there's a lot of value to using QR codes.

Brenda Burrell:

Couldn't resist, sorry.

Matthew Stublefield:

So to help with managing physical assets, you can now print QR codes which you can then tape, or you can put them in a label as part of a label maker to manage them better through Jira service management cloud which is pretty sweet. There's a wide range of scanner guns as well, that I don't know. I love to research scanner guns for scanning these types of things, but we won't go into that now. We can move on to our next cloud [crosstalk 00:13:24] Jira work.

Ryan Spilken:

Five years in five years of doing this podcast, we've never gotten to talk about scanner guns but I'm totally not surprised-

Matthew Stublefield:

That's true.

Ryan Spilken:

... that you enjoy looking at scanner guns. But what I want to know is if you can create a QR code and then program a swarm of drones to fly it up into the sky, to illuminate the night so that people can scan it and find out about...

Matthew Stublefield:

I mean, you lost me in the end there but at the beginning of it, I was like, "Amazon's got that."

Ryan Spilken:

And all the scanning guns you could ever ask for.

Matthew Stublefield:

That's true.

Brenda Burrell:

There is no segue from that. So I'll just move on. Over in Jira work management, you can now customize the cards on your board to see the in info information that's most important to you. You can choose to see as much or as little on the cards as you wish. To adjust the information you see, you select more at the top right of your screen on the board view. Select customized cards, and then choose what values you'd like to be visible on your cards by selecting or deselecting the fields you'd like to view. And at will automatically adjust on your board view.

Ryan Spilken:

Confluence cloud has some nice nude features, including transforming a page into a blog. There are probably a lot of great reasons why you take an idea started out as a page. And then it turns into a blog when you're ready. Sometimes content needs a little bit more time to just date or ferment, whatever you want to use. So you have a few options for when you make the switch. You can keep your pages a draft, and then use the more actions menu also known as the ellipses menu to publish it as a blog. Or you can publish it as many times as you need, then you the ellipse menu to convert it to a blog. Both of the options, however, you choose to publish will move the page into the blog section of the space where the page was initially created.

Ryan Spilken:

Any comments that are included in the page will be transferred over to the blog as well. If you want to remove those, well delete, resolve at your leisure. An update that I find super interesting because it points to bigger things happening in the background is Confluence Cloud now generating a recommendation of what pages to archives. Atlassian has added a notification email that will recommend archiving pages that have been excluded by a bulk archiving action. With the ability to archive a page in all of its nested pages or a whole branch of the page tree. Sometimes not all pages in the branch can be included. This happens when the archiver doesn't have the right permissions to view a nested page. Or doesn't have the permission to archive the page. Either way, there are circumstances that can lead to a page not being archived.

Ryan Spilken:

If any of the year pages are left behind, Confluence will go all click come on you and let in an email. What this points to me is that the statistics about page usage are starting to bubble their way into the way people use the tool. And that's something that is really interesting for the future. I think there's going to be some stats and some information that savvy information managers can use to determine where people are engaging with content and Confluence. And that's pretty cool.

Ryan Spilken:

Now this one I'd like to know your two opinions on, because all collaborators will now get credited as page authors because the person who starts a page isn't necessarily the same person who finishes it. And if more than one person had been working on something together, Atlassian thinks that you all deserve credit, even if you're just fixing the grammar. So that's why they're changing the byline on Confluence pages, so that all collaborators, anyone who edits the page and makes changes will be credited as an author, not just the first person who created it. So is this good? I mean, it is good. It's good to show that but is everyone an author?

Brenda Burrell:

My reaction to that is, what's the limit? How many people can I get collaborating on a page? And how long can I make that biline?

Matthew Stublefield:

Yeah. I do wonder in terms of the UI how long that will get. I'm going to give the benefit of the doubt that UI-wise, it's going to be fine and it's going to be beautiful and everything will be great. I can imagine a line of 20 people and it not working great but let's give them the benefit of the doubt that they've thought that through. I think there is good benefit here. Sometimes somebody creates a page and that's literally all they do. They create it and other people go and do the work. Sometimes the last person who edited it didn't have a meaningful change. The reason I think this is valuable is, I've worked at organizations before. You can look at my LinkedIn and probably guess which one, because I've only worked at two so far and I'm about to join my third, but let's just leave it out, I worked at organizations before-

Ryan Spilken:

No one will ever know.

Matthew Stublefield:

... where it was shockingly political and challenging to get people the credit they deserve for the work that they performed and specifically around writing content, getting people a byline. Again, I thought that would be straightforward. They wrote it. They did the work but there was pressure to hide that and to not give certain people for certain reasons, and we don't need to air this out from years ago. But some of you, you listener's, you've been around. You can guess why someone might want to, I don't think there's any more better than discriminate when it comes to this type of thing.

Matthew Stublefield:

So there's a part of me that looks at this and goes, I like building that in. It takes the control out of the hands of somebody who might be more discriminatory. So it seems like a small thing but especially when you're starting your career, being able to point at something and be like, "I contributed. I wrote. I did that. That's part of my portfolio. That's part of the value that I provide." And having that displayed in a way that can't be ignored, that can't be removed or taken from you, I think that's very powerful. I think this is a good move.

Ryan Spilken:

Yeah. Nice. Finally, in Confluence Cloud, they've added ADG 3 flags. So Atlassian needs to keep up with the new style. They're in fashion week, they're everywhere and they've updated notifications in Confluence. So instead of the top right hand notification that everyone's used to, you can now expect to see it in the bottom left, shock and horror.

Matthew Stublefield:

Last, we've got some updates to compass which we always delight seen in these releases notes every other week. But this week's time, I'm not going to read the first one in verbatim. It's create a new component. That's automatically added as a dependency. The paragraph then goes on to use the word component six times the word dependency four times. What it's really doing is it's an automation where when you create a component, you can in that moment when you do it, create a relationship between the one you've just created and the one that you're looking at. And I'm assuming we don't get any pictures or sick gifts but I'm assuming there's a way to map dependency relationship here such that if you want to have an upstream dependency created, it's just automatically doing that.

Matthew Stublefield:

So hazah, and then going forward that dependency mapping is built in whenever you select that component. So that's cool. It's just a hard thing to describe in text. Dependency mapping for me is always a visual medium. It would've been nice to show this but that's okay. That's not how these release work.

Ryan Spilken:

If you like a visual map of dependencies, do I have some good news for you?

Matthew Stublefield:

Yes, because the next compass feature is visualizing component dependencies on a spatial interactive map. Another sick feature that is not in my lasting cloud instance yet. Not that I've really been doing anything with compass, but I love this idea. So when you add component dependencies in compass, which now you can do six times faster, you can generate this dependency map to see a visualizations of those with a component centric view of the software infrastructure. And then you can traverse that map to view and understand the interdependencies amongst the components or navigate to a particular component's details page to find out more about it.

Matthew Stublefield:

Sweet. I love that it's just building that automatically. Though this is the type of thing that in the past plug-ins would've done. There have been multiple visualization plug-ins created for Atlassian products. Compass is building it out of the box which I got no bones about that. I think that's great. But like so many things, it does signal where is Atlassian head of a cloud in the future? Will there be more of these types of things where external vendors have built them in the past Atlassian's just going to start doing? I think the probably, yes.

Brenda Burrell:

Over in BitBucket Cloud. So Matthew, you may not have gotten any gifts in your compass release notes, but there are some gifts in a blog post we're going to link to about BitBucket's redesigned branch page, and these gifts show diffs. And I, for some reason, I found that unbearably funny. So apologies to everyone, but there are gifts of diffs.

Ryan Spilken:

Have those dif gifs up in a jif. Wait a minute.

Matthew Stublefield:

Wait. Yeah, I was going to say, do you pronounce GIF for JIF? Because if the giffs gets Jeff.

Ryan Spilken:

I feel terrible for our transcriptionist.

Brenda Burrell:

And we've effectively broken all of our brains. So to try and reign it back in, BitBucket Cloud, there a redesigned branch page that Atlassian have taken diffs and commits on a single page rather than having them spread on different tabs. You will also be able to see the file headers of the diffs as you scroll through the files so that you don't lose your place when you're viewing long diffs. A lot of nice little features that have been made to make it just easier to review differences between branches. Also each diff is collapsible so that you can mark your progress and reduce your scrolling as you review the branch. Each diff side by side view is now available in line instead of as a motor window. So it's a lot of nice usability features for viewing the diffs, check out the gifts in the blog post.

Brenda Burrell:

In addition, the sidebar now has a file tree. That includes key details on collapsible cards, including things like build status and relevant poll requests between the two branches giving you a quick reference at any time. And on the right side bar is an improved file tree for navigating between different files. In the diff you can see the status of each file, the number of diffs in each. And you can tell which files have the most changes without having to open each one. So some navigability... Is that a word? I made it up... navigation improvements there. Better support for forked repos. Previously the branch page did not support cross fork comparison but now it does. On a forked repository, the compare option displays all the branches from the original repo for comparison. If you are using BitBucket Cloud, these changes will be progressively rolled out over the next few weeks. So in your improved branch reviewing experiences on BitBucket Cloud.

Ryan Spilken:

Over in the on-premise world, Jira software 8.22.1 has been released with a whopping one story in it. Now this one story is interesting. It has a little bit of a thread going on it because up until Jira server or data center 8.18, users used to be able to receive Jira notifications without being granted application access. So you could have theoretically Jira notifications being sent to people who were not Jira users. Now this was viewed as a security issue. So it was removed from Jira 8.19 on. However, there has been a need for Jira administrators to have notifications go out to people who weren't necessarily Jira users but were still actively engaged in the work. So with Jira software 8.22.1, this feature has been added back in. Think of it as a notification only account that does not eat up a Jira license. So from here out, you can create a list of users who can receive Jira notifications without actually using Jira.

Matthew Stublefield:

So like your C level executives, that's seems likely here... In Jira service management 4.22.1, we've got nine issues. What is the aforementioned story, add the ability to send your notifications users who don't have application access. The rest are bug fixes. So a few related to insights and editing that wasn't working or custom field not showing values in transition. We're referencing another custom value, like some edge case type things that probably not everybody had hit. Adding multiple single user picker fields to the customer portal caused some fields to not be editable. So if you're hitting some of these issues where things aren't working as expected, link will is always to these and it might be time to do an upgrade. But again, some of these, you may not be experiencing.

Brenda Burrell:

In Confluence on-prem, we actually have two releases to tell you about. 7.16.3 is a bug fix release, includes five bug fixes, including directory synchronous failing if there's duplicate users present in active directory or LDAP. Space ID not being updated for custom objects when their containers are moved to another space, et cetera, et cetera. And then hot off the presses as of the morning, we record this, Confluence 7.17. Some highlights of 7.17 include making your integrations more secure with OAuth 2.0. You can now configure Confluence as an OAuth 2.0 client and provider allowing it to exchange data with external applications in both directions. Either by giving external applications, access to Confluence data or letting Confluence request data from those applications. This allows you to make your current integrations more secure and reliable.

Brenda Burrell:

There are some new monitoring screens allowing you to use JMX. So if you're already using JMX to monitor things like memory usage and CPU utilization. There is now application monitoring within Confluence itself, which is pretty cool. There are some app specific metrics that can allow you to diagnose performance problems and spot issues before they happen. There are some performance monitoring dashboards to get you started. So if you don't currently have any monitoring, now would be a great time to take a look at it. There are some Grafana templates that you can use out of the box, or as a jumping off point to build your own dashboards.

Brenda Burrell:

You can encrypt database passwords stored in the confluence.cfg.xml file for JDBC connections only. There are now two encryption methods, a byte 64 cipher and an algorithm cipher and the ability to create your own cipher. 7.17 also adds support for PostgreSQL 12, 13, and 14. And you can now disable individual health checks in your troubleshooting and support tools, which is useful if you want to skip particular checks. For a full list of resolved bugs and there's 48 resolved issues with this release, check out the release notes, which we will link to in our show notes.

Matthew Stublefield:

And one thing to note is all of these updates are available for both data center and server. It's been a long time since we've had a release that applies fully to both. In particular, I think this is an upgrade that you want to do as soon as possible and get that database password encrypted. I have not had to run a Confluence site for a long time. I mean, almost eight years. This is one of those updates where I'm like, "You couldn't already do that." The year of our Lord 2022. Why was this password still being stored in prem text? It's not terribly insecure because like it's on-prem. You should have your firewalls, everything else in place. But the ability to have these things encrypted has been around for long enough. Now I was shocked.

Matthew Stublefield:

Yeah. 7.17, I would be upgrading take advantage of this just as quickly as possible. I think these are some really big improvements and I think it's awesome that it lasting us, put them out for both server and data center. However, the next Confluence update is cloud only, still pretty sweet though. We will link to a developer blog titled, Bringing you new Confluence GraphQL APIs, reading through this there's not a lot that says this is cloud only. But as you get into the documentation, you've got to have a cloud ID to call the APIs. Now as has already been well established on this podcast, I am not a developer. I will never be writing anything against the APIs.

Matthew Stublefield:

Not just because again, sadly, I'm leaving Adaptavist in a week, but also because I wouldn't really know where to start. But there are multiple products that I have managed Adaptavist work with that we've been increasingly using GraphQL to interact with. It is sweet. It's slick. It's something that I can see the value up and I'm really excited that it lasts you and it is standardizing on this is bringing it in because there's so many other systems that are starting to use GraphQL. It means that for people who are learning how to work with GraphQL, those skills are going to be very transferable. You're going to be able to work with a bunch of different things.

Matthew Stublefield:

So one of the Confluence management systems that we're starting to use adapters called GraphCMS uses GraphQL. And not only will how to work with that API, but it means if you want to build an integration between multiple systems that are using GraphQL to move content around, it's just going to be easier and easier. So I love CMS. I love seeing Atlassian not build a Walt garden. I love seeing investment in a standard platform for API development. This is beta right now. So you've got to used to specifically, how we making the query but there's great documentation here to help you get started with it and start exploring some example workflows for Confluence of building things out and trying it out. This is specifically Confluence Cloud, GraphQL API and beta right now. But my assumption and hope is this will continue spreading out to the rest of the Atlassian products and bring tremendous value you to the Atlassian Ecosystem and users. So thrilled to see this move.

Ryan Spilken:

I spoke with Adaptavist CTO, Chief Technical Officer, John Mort about this article. And he says, and I quote, "I'm excited about this and at the same time, I want more investment in the REST API." So we got a yes from the CTO.

Matthew Stublefield:

Yeah. And I was wondering in the back of my head, if this was a signal of moving away from REST, if we're going to start getting... Will it be both or are they going to transition? REST API support and cloud has always been, like to date, cloud is iterating growing. But REST API support is still not as robust as most developers would like in cloud. I wonder if they're evaluating GraphQL because it is beta, time for evaluation. I wonder if they're evaluating GraphQL to potentially replace REST for cloud.

Ryan Spilken:

Well, we will text you if there's news on that matter.

Matthew Stublefield:

Thank you.

Ryan Spilken:

And finally Team '22 is happening in a week. We're recording this on Tuesday, March 22nd. Team kicks off on April 5th or sixth and it's right around the corner. I believe it is. It's actually April 6th. So if you're coming, I'm going to be there. Come see me. I'm the big weird looking guy in the Adaptavist booth with the name tag that says Ryan. I would love to connect with you and hear what's going on in your world. And there is also the day before team, the top vendor alliance of Appfire, SmartBear, Tempoo and Adaptavist are doing App Day 2022 at the Venetian.

Ryan Spilken:

So we will include registration links for both Team '22 and App Day in the show notes, sign up, come visit with us. Come hang out in Vegas. If you come see me, I'll do my best to get you into the Adaptavist party. Okay. I will do everything I can if you come see me and say, "Podcast." I will do my best to get you into the Adaptavist party. Yeah. See you in Vegas. And what happens in Vegas should all be very family friendly and perfectly fine to discuss in the future.

Matthew Stublefield:

And that's it for this week's discussion of the Atlassian Ecosystem Podcast. As always, hit us up on social @adaptavist. Tell us if you'll be in Vegas. Tell us if you found some Atlassian notes we have overlooked because they're always publishing in new and strange places without telling anybody. And if you like this podcast and other podcasts, like it, be sure to check out the Adaptavist Podcast network at adaptavits.com/podcast. We hope to see you here and elsewhere. I may not actually see you because you can't see us. We can't see you. And really that's for everybody's benefit. But we hope that you like, share, subscribe. Give us some reviews. Let us know what you think. So for the last time on behalf of Ryan Spilken and Brenda Burrell, this is Matthew Stublefield signing off the Adaptavist Ecosystem Podcast, a member of the Adaptavist Podcast network. I'm pausing. There was a particular thing I wanted to say.